Archive for April, 2012

Apr 18

Where can I get the Chinese calligraphy equipments in Malaysia?

I want to know that the name and address of the shops that sells Chinese Calligraphy equipments in the city of Kuala Lumpur, Malaca and Johar Baru .

You can get it in bookstore.

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Apr 18

The Erhu – China’s Haunting Two String Fiddle Comes to Broadway

I felt touched but unable to express myself in words. It seemed like listening to a story that moved every parts of my heart. I even wanted to ask, what happened after that? when the music finished.

That’s how I felt when Ms. Qi Xiaochun played her instrument, the erhu, at a Chinese New Year Show sponsored by New Tang Dynasty Televison (NTDTV) last January.

The erhu, sometimes known in the West as the Chinese violin or Chinese two string fiddle, is a two-stringed bowed musical instrument. The instrument looks so simple that I even tried to build an Erhu when I was about 12 years old. Of course, the sound quality was not good at all, but I really loved it for a while.

The erhu can be traced back to instruments introduced into China more than a thousand years ago. It started to be popular in Southern China during the Sung Dynasty (960-1279 AD), where it was called “Nan-hu”, Nan meaning south in Chinese.

Nowadays the erhu often plays an important role in national orchestras. In smaller orchestras, there are usually two to six erhu players, in larger ones, 10 to 12. In fact, in Chinese orchestras the erhu plays the part the violin does in Western orchestras. Like the Western violin, the erhu is renowned for its expressiveness and is often said to echo the human voice.

Growing up in Shanghai, Ms. Qi began learning to play this difficult instrument at the age of six, taught by a friend of her father’s. She was later accepted to the Shanghai Music Conservatory and won an award at the Chinese National Erhu Competition. She has also played at the Hollywood Bowl, but her most memorable performances have been at the New Tang Dynasty television network’s (NTDTV) Chinese New Year spectaculars.

In addition to performing, Ms. Qi also teaches the erhu. “When learning to play the erhu,” she says, “people must develop basic skills first. The music, however, comes from the person’s character. People carry their own things into the music. What they want to express, and also the person as a whole, is expressed through the music. As an artist, your moral character will also determine your skill.”

This idea is reflected throughout ancient Chinese culture, whether in painting, martial arts, or poetry—in order to cultivate talent, one must cultivate the whole person. Ms. Qi finds this philosophy is also also present in NTDTV’s performances. She hopes that when people see the show, they will not only be entertained, but will also experience something about the deeper qualities these ancient Chinese Arts can bring to people. In Ms. Qi’s opinion, it is simple: “pure compassion, pure beauty.”

Ms. Qi Xiaochun will perform the erhu in Holiday Wonders at the Beacon Theater on Broadway, Dec. 19-24, and also at the 2007 NTDTV Chinese New Year Spectacular shows which are touring North America from Jan. to Mar. 2007. http://shows.ntdtv.com

Jason Huang
http://www.articlesbase.com/music-articles/the-erhu-chinas-haunting-two-string-fiddle-comes-to-broadway-82714.html

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Apr 18

Chinese Martial Arts Is Becoming A World-Wide Phenomenon

Chinese martial arts refer to the enormous variety of martial art styles native to China. Kung fu and wushu are popular Chinese terms that have become synonymous with Chinese martial arts. The development of Chinese martial arts can initially be traced to self-defense needs, hunting activities and military training. Eventually, Chinese martial arts became an important element of Chinese culture.

Chinese martial arts started to spread internationally with the end of the Chinese civil war and the founding of the People’s Republic of China on October 1, 1949. Many well known martial art practitioners choose to escape from the Communist rule and migrate to Taiwan, Hong Kong and other parts of the world. Those masters started to teach within the oversea Chinese communities but eventually they expand their teachings to include people from other cultures.

Within China, the practice of traditional martial arts was discouraged during the turbulent years of the Chinese Cultural Revolution (1969-1976). The government instead promoted the concept of Wushu as a replacement. In 1958, the government established the All-China Wushu Association as an umbella organization to regulate martial arts training. The Chinese State Commission for Physical Culture and Sports took the lead in creating standardized forms for tai chi chuan and other fists and weapon arts. During this period, a national Wushu system that includes standard forms, teaching curricula and instructor grading were established. Wushu was introduced at both the high school and university level. The suppression of traditional teaching was relaxed during the era of reconstruction (1976-1989), as Communist ideology became more accommodating to alternative viewpoints. In 1979, the State Commission for Physical Culture and Sports created a special task force to revaluate the teaching and practice of Wushu. In 1986, the Chinese National Research Institute of Wushu was established as the central authority for the research and administration of Wushu activities in the People’s Republic. Presently, both traditional styles and modern Wushu approaches are being promoted by the Chinese government.

Chinese martial arts have now evolved from its Chinese heritage to become world-wide phenomenon. No longer restricted by ethnic origin, students of Chinese martial arts can now be found in every part of the world, each student continuing a rich and ancient tradition of self discovery.

sunshine01

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Apr 18

Painting Village – China

chinese painting July 2006
If you fancy an old master but don’t want to pay millions, Dafen, China, is the place to go. For a few dollars, the ‘painter workers’ will whip you up whatever you fancy. The village already supplies 600 galleries.

Just 17 years ago, Dafen was a rural backwater. Then art entrepreneur Huang Jiang moved in. “I needed lots of people to work for me. Here was a whole village”, he explains. By applying China’s production line techniques to art and training lots of artists, he has boosted the town’s turnover to $22 million p.a. Orders come in from around the world.

Produced by ABC Australia
Distributed by Journeyman Pictures

Duration : 0:7:22

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Apr 18

Chinese Batik Cultural Arts Crafts Art Craft

chinese crafts xtaaxthttp://gdata.youtube.com/feeds/api/users/xtaaxtSportsChinese, Batik, Cultural, Arts, Crafts, Art, CraftChinese Batik Cultural Arts Crafts Art Craft

Duration : 0:8:20

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Apr 18

chinese calligraphy set demo

chinese calligraphy writing with the Chinese Calligraphy set

Duration : 0:8:1

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Apr 18

Invisible Chinese Artist

chinese art Invisible Chinese Artist

It’s like Where’s Waldo, only real.

Duration : 0:2:3

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