Category: Chinese Art

Aug 21

5-Day Hands-on Workshop on Chinese Art with Victoria and Henry Li in Los Angeles

chinese art Workshop Dates: From Tuesday Sept 25 to Saturday Sept 29, 2012. Register today!

http://www.blueheronarts.com/product_info.php?cPath=21&products_id=1038

Looking forward to seeing you in the workshop!

Thank you!
Henry and Victoria Li

Duration : 0:4:18

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Aug 20

About Yue Minjun – a Chinese Artist

Yue Minjun’s paintings offer a light-hearted approach to philosophical enquiry and contemplation of existence. Drawing connotations to the disparate images of the Laughing Buddha and the inane gap toothed grin of Alfred E. Newman, Yue’s self-portraits have been describe by theorist Li Xianting as “a self-ironic response to the spiritual vacuum and folly of modern-day China. The Paintings, sculptures and installations of Yue Minjun always feature uniform laughing faces. And if these laughing faces are observed carefully, it will be noticed that these faces are the face of Yue Minjun.

The acidic tones and commercialized vacuity of his works are used to underscore the insincerity of his figures’ mirth. As both antagonists and anti-heroes, Yue’s hysterical cohorts equally bully the viewer and stand as subjects of ridicule. Using laughter as a denotation of violence and vulnerability, Yue’s paintings balance a zeitgeist of modern day anxiety with an Eastern philosophical ethos, positing the response to the true nature of reality as an endless cynical guffaw.Yue Minjun presents various realities that emerge as the background behind the laughing visages. These realities emerge through various easy to recognize symbols, metaphors and signs, or through depictions of daily life. The laughing faces and the representations of reality in Yue Minjun’s works are closely related. And this relationship shows Yue Minjun’s fairly easy to read cynicism in confrontation with reality.

Can the works of Yue Minjun be said to be self-portraits? Does his artwork present any insight into the conflict between individuality and collectivism? Does his work indicate self-identification that represents the pressing of the self-identity into a collective existence? Of the many questions that arise, this is The mose basic: Can the meaning of Yue Minjun’s self-portraits be categorized as auratic or post-auratic Within the development of modern art, the search for reality through representation has been fully deter-mined by the relationship between the individual absolute and reality. Yue subverts the grandiose aura of art history through his adaptation of pop aesthetics.

Selected Exhibitions-

2004

• Yue Minjun: Sculptures And Paintings, Schoeni Art Gallery, Hong Kong

2003

• Yue Minjun: Beijing Ironicals, Prüss & Ochs Gallery, Berlin, Germany

• Yue Minjun, Meile Gallery, Switzerland

2002

• Soaking In Silly Laughter: One Of Art Singapore 2002, Soobin Art Gallery, Singapore

• Yue Minjun: Handling, One World Art Center, China

2000

• Red Ocean: Yue Minjun, Chinese Contemporary, London, Uk

Conclusions:

Yue Minjun’s paintings offer a light-hearted approach to philosophical enquiry and contemplation of existence. The laughing faces and the representations of reality in Yue Minjun’s works are closely related

What to Do Next…

If you want any information about Yue Minjun or looking for his paintings please visit us on http://www.saatchi-gallery.co.uk/artists/yue_minjun.htm

Saatchi-gallery
http://www.articlesbase.com/art-articles/about-yue-minjun-a-chinese-artist-134545.html

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Aug 18

Sugar Art made by master craftsman from China

chinese art Watch this talented & skillful craftsman wooing the crowds with his beautifully intricate creations. These candies are definitely too pretty to be eaten!!

Duration : 0:5:29

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Aug 15

Sotheby’s big with fine Chinese art

chinese art Sept. 1 – Auction giant Sotheby’s previews its largest-ever fine Chinese Painting collection in Hong Kong, ahead of its sale in October. Elly Park reports.

Duration : 0:1:40

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Aug 13

About Xiang Jing – a Chinese Artist

Xiang Jing was born on 1968 in Beijing, China.From 1984 TO 1988 he was Student of the attached middle school of the Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing.In 1990 – 1995 Xiang Jing attained a Bachelor Degree from the Sculpture Department, Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing and he currently lives and works in Shanghai

Xiang Jing’s eerily life-like sculptures confront the viewer with a duplicitous engagement with outward appearance and inner psychology. Xiang’s works range from the larger than life to miniature; cast in bronze or polyurethane, they draw from a classical tradition and aesthetic to portray the experiences of contemporary women. Her works depicting teenagers clubbing, shopping, and primping offer a veneer of generic beauty, sparsely accessorised with synthetic looking props and latest fashion trends; their appearance of mundane innocence is contradicted through their expressions of violence, depression, and malaise. Towering over the viewer as a goddess-like effigy, her vacant gaze projects downward with oppressive force: her nakedness and vulnerability evoking a self-contemplative reflection of inadequacy, humility and emptiness.

Xiang’s value lies not only in her uncanny ability to replicate the facial movements, the gestures, the physical tick that accompany a particular psychological mood, but also in her capacity to augment these psychological states by ingenious props – a cushion and a bright blue bow for a coquettish girl, a tall skinny stood upon which to crouch for a satirically reflective woman smoking on a long, skinny cigarette. In addition to props, Xiang pays meticulous attention to the materials she uses and the ensuing surfaces. In Your Body, Xiang presents a gigantic nude. Fabricated from painted fibreglass, the figure is unnerving in detail, her expertly faux finished skin radiating a sickly, waxen pallor. Shorn headed, and slumped on a simple wooden chair, her subjective doll-like presence reflects the epitome of emotional depletion.

Selected Exhibitions:-

2006

• You’re Body – Xiang Jing 2000-2005, Shanghai Art Museum, Shanghai, China

2005

• Keep In Silence, China Art Seasons Gallery, Beijing, China

2003

• Women In The Mirror, Chinese European Art Center, Xiamen, China

• Art of Xiang Jing, Tuan Cheng Gallery, Beijing, China

2001

• Day Dream – Solo Exhibition, Ivy Bookstore, Shanghai, China

Conclusions:

Xiang Jing’s sculpture is their expressiveness they are wistful, critical, languorous, reflective, and melancholic – they encompass and embody virtually every human emotion. . He had already exhibited some of good arts in his own style and the impact of the work had won him a strong reputation in Chinese Art circles

What to Do Next…

If you want any information about Xiang Jing or looking for his paintings please visit us on http://www.saatchi-gallery.co.uk/artists/xiang_jing.htm

Saatchi-gallery
http://www.articlesbase.com/art-articles/about-xiang-jing-a-chinese-artist-124327.html

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Aug 12

A Chinese artist’s crusade on corruption

chinese art A report by China’s central bank has accused the country’s communist party cadre and officials of funneling $123.6 billion out of the country.

Al Jazeera’s Melissa Chan in Beijing visits an artist on a mission to keep a visual record of the culprits.

Duration : 0:2:35

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Aug 09

ALTERED STATES: Art of Zhang Huan 张洹

chinese art Inside the studio and creative mind of Zhang Huan, one of the most recognized Chinese Artists working in both the US and China. His latest exhibition at the Asia Society includes performance works, photographs, and sculpture.

Duration : 0:5:7

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Aug 06

MATCHA: Contemporary Chinese Art Panel (4/21/2011)

chinese art A Panel Discussion with Curators Lu Peng & Bai Hua, and Artists Wang Guangyi, Zhou Chunya, & Hong Lei. Translated by Gary Xu.

This panel discussion took place at the Asian Art Museum during the run of the Pure Views pop-up installation: For a very limited three days, the Asian Art Museum hosted a special installation of never-before-seen artworks by some of China’s most celebrated and emerging artists. Pure Views is curated by Lu Peng and Bai Hua, and co-organized and sponsored by iCulture (http://theiculture.org/) and Institutions of Chinart (http://www.institutionsofchinart.org/).

Duration : 1:13:59

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Aug 06

Pottery Art in China With a Long History I — Preface

“Tao (pottery)”, according to the figure described in oracle bone inscriptions, it implies a person who was squatted and sit on the ground, with a tool just like a wood stick modeling clay. Through sintering adobes will form into ceramics, which we called pottery today.

chinese art

Archaeological discoveries have proved that as early as in the Neolithic Age (about 8000-2000 BC) the Chinese people had invented pottery. The agricultural production emerged in later primitive society had bought a relatively more fixed life to the ancestors of the Chinese people, which also produced the demand for pottery objectively. So, in order to improve the quality of life and make their lives more convenient, gradually Chinese people invented pottery through the burning of clay.

The word first appeared on pottery, it was found on a ceramic flake left by Shang Dynasty, and which is the only piece so far, while there are many pieces of ceramic flakes without words on. With a long history of pottery, China has left a great number of ceramic heritages, among these historic treasures, the oldest pottery was been produced out in BC 9,000 (with carbon isotope C14 detection).

The original pottery were been burned into in open-air, and these primal pottery are rough and fragile. About BC 8000, people started to put the ceramic model into pottery kiln, and with the method of controlled burning to improve the pottery, quality, through this method the pottery produced became not only more strong but also more beautiful, and turned into one kind of artworks.

chinese art

Before the Shang Dynasty, the main colors of the pottery are only three: red, gray and black. Later based on the development of enamel coating technology, the color of pottery became more abundant and bright. In the Tang Dynasty, faience ware, also called painted pottery or colored pottery, one kind of Tang handicrafts was created out, among which, the Tang tri-colored pottery is the most well-known typical work.

On the basis of the high-level ceramic technology accumulated long-term, China produced porcelain ware in the world, which has become an important medium of the exchanges between the East and West cultures and economy, and people in the West just called porcelain as CHINA namely the country of China, it can be also said to describe China with Chinese porcelain (china). In Western languages the word “china”, whose meaning also includes pottery. In the history of the development of Chinese ceramics, the pottery was appeared before porcelain, and the porcelain was took birth from pottery.

Krista QQ(www.123giftfactory.com)

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Aug 03

The China Project – Queensland Gallery of Modern Art

chinese art Queenslands Gallery of Modern Art presents The China Project, a three-part display that considers contemporary Chinese Art practice.

In this video, Nicholas Ngs delightful soundtrack accompanies Russell Storer as he gives us an insight into the beauty and relevance of the China Project Exhibition.

Follow the Sun to Brisbane’s winter events and attractions at http://www.brisbaneinwinter.com.au

Duration : 0:2:37

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