Nov 25

Any Chinese martial arts that were not influenced in any way by Shaolin or Buddhism?

Are there any Chinese martial art styles that are not influenced by Shaolin or Buddhism? So not Shaolin Kung Fu, WuDang, or TaiChiQuan, because those all involved Buddhism or visit to the Shaolin temples throughout history.

Sorry, but WUDANG Taoist kung fu was not influenced by Buddhism, it was the other way around.

The Buddhist adopted the Yin/Yang emblem of Taoism; and Taoism is the indigenous religion of China, Buddhism was imported from India.

WUDANG kung fu preceded Shaolin kung fu, some claim it is a better more effective style, and the Buddhist Shaolin Temple was destroyed in the 1700s by Wudang Taoist Monestary (with the aid of the emporer’s troops). Wudang ‘Taoist’ kung fu prevailed.

It was at WUDANG mountain that Jackie Chan taught Taoist kung fu to his student in KARATE KID II.

6
comments

6 comments!!!

  1. Polkadot Pajamas says:

    Bruce Lee’s Jeet Kun Do. He started as a street fighter.
    References :

  2. sennachie1973 says:

    bagua is said to be confucian. and taichi is actually linked to taoism instead of buddhism from what i read.
    References :

  3. Ymarsakar says:

    Anything that existed from 500 BC to 0 AD would apply.
    References :

  4. Bob Klein says:

    My understanding is that the Wudang arts, Bagua, Xing-I and Tai-chi-Chuan all arose from Taoist temples and were not influenced by Buddhism. Shaolin was and is practiced at Buddhist temples.

    The nature of Tai-chi-Chuan for example, is minimal external movement with maximum internal movement of energy. It is in keeping with the quietness and non-interference of Taoism. You don’t block the opponent, for example, but weave in between his strikes. So you don’t try to stop your opponent from his strikes but just not be where they land.

    Buddhism is more active in the sense that Buddhists engage in extensive arguement about doctrinal or philosophical issues. And so the Shaolin arts do emphasize blocking and development of muscle strength. The martial arts arise out of the underlying philosophy.
    References :
    Over 35 years teaching Tai-chi-Chuan
    http://www.movementsofmagic.com

  5. Olga says:

    Shaolin refers to Buddhist styles, and Tai Chi Chuan refers to Taoist styles. There were four main religions in China. The main one was a native polytheism that changed as time passed. It once called its supreme deity Shangdi (Lord on High). Then, it just referred to Tian (Heaven). Finally, this supreme deity was called Yu Ti (Jade Emperor){of Heaven}. Taoism and Confucianism are more philosophies without theology. Buddhism from India was the fourth major religion. Chinese are syncretistic. European religions had few followers in China. As I said, Buddhism and Taoism were the religions that influenced martial arts the most. I think you are mistaken.
    References :

  6. BigBill says:

    Sorry, but WUDANG Taoist kung fu was not influenced by Buddhism, it was the other way around.

    The Buddhist adopted the Yin/Yang emblem of Taoism; and Taoism is the indigenous religion of China, Buddhism was imported from India.

    WUDANG kung fu preceded Shaolin kung fu, some claim it is a better more effective style, and the Buddhist Shaolin Temple was destroyed in the 1700s by Wudang Taoist Monestary (with the aid of the emporer’s troops). Wudang ‘Taoist’ kung fu prevailed.

    It was at WUDANG mountain that Jackie Chan taught Taoist kung fu to his student in KARATE KID II.
    References :

Reply