Nov 19

Are there any Chinese martial arts that are older than Shaolin, and is not influenced by Shaolin or Buddhism?

Are there any Chinese martial art styles that are older than Shaolin, and is not influenced by Shaolin or Buddhism? Some styles, such as Shaolin Kung Fu, TaiChiQuan, and Wudang are influenced by Buddhism. TaiChiQuan is also because the master that created the martial art trained at Shaolin first.
Lol, Samurai Chef, you always answer my questions.

Yes, there are many martial arts older than Shaolin. There were warring states long before Shaolin existed and each warlord/army/state/village had their own fighting style/moves. When Ta Mo arrived in China he introduced 18 exercises/routines to the meditating monks to keep them from falling asleep. From those moves started the Shaolin kung fu style. Later on, most kung fu styles incorporated the Shaolin training regiment into their own system. That`s the simple version of the history.

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4 comments!!!

  1. Samurai Chef says:

    the chinese didn’t see them as separate religions they were the same to them.

    the chinese followed taoist, buddhist & confuciust beliefs all at the same time as the exact same things just they expanded on each other in different ways and they left interpretation up to the person.

    it is possible but most have mixed concepts.

    *edit*
    I answer everyone’s questions, well the ones I think are good anyways you just must have good questions I happen to have a bit of knowledge about lol

    *edit 2*
    @pakua82004- they referred to them as the three doctrines and they all expended upon chinese folk mythology even though buddhism came from india the chinese developed their own version called chan buddhism that is exclusively chinese.

    I’m a chan buddist & my sifu is a former tai chi teacher and devout taoist we talk philosophy with all the time because they are 2 of thee 3 doctrines of chinese philosophy and religion they aren’t just one or the other but both.
    References :
    martial arts training since 1997

  2. Kokoro says:

    this was answered a few times already,
    yes there is quite a number. you were given a few of them. in previous questions. if your trying to make a list of the different ones good luck i have never seen a complete one yet
    References :
    30yrs ma

  3. pakua82004 says:

    Let me straighten some weird misunderstanding concerning Chinese religious beliefs. Buddhism, is a religion brought in from India and the ultimate aim is to seek Enlightenment, thus stopping the endless cycles of rebirths. Confucianism is indigenous, and concern the here and now, not about going to meet your Maker that sort of stuff and it is about order amongst peoples to achieve and maintain peace and happiness. Taoism, a contemporary of Confucianism, is also an indigenous development but contrary to the latter, it is about achieving immortality or longevity, and to, seriously, meet your Maker (though He goes by a different name, very Chinese of course). All three co-exist peaceful for centuries, albeit in the beginning, there were persecutions of Buddhists during the Tang Dynasty (845 CE). Let me also mention that to day, there are Muslims in China, millions of them, much more than the whole population of Indonesia. And, there is at least one known CMA (Cha-jia chuen) attributed to the Chinese Muslims. It is a Live and Let Live attitude, pragmatic and conducive to long term peace and happiness. Chinese do not consider these religions all the same. What is the same is the commonality amongst all world religions, and that is…..the promotion of peace, happiness, and morality. Wudang, including Kunlun are centres of Taoist studies; Emei, Wutai and Songshan Shaolin, besides being centres of Buddhist studies are also martial arts centres. I have no information about Confucianism as a martial arts though they have qigong practices, but its moral and philosophical ideals have permeated Chinese society and psyche for centuries, including those Communist leaders now governing China.

    Buddhism came into China during the Qin Dynasty (221-206BCE) and Bodhidharma’s arrival into China was in 527CE, about 700 years later from the time Buddhism first reached the shores of China. Chinese martial arts tradition did not start from the arrival of Bodhidharma as there are martial developments from numerous warfares since recorded history (2500BCE). Early archaeological accounts described a form of daoyin, a qigong practice, and wrestling, besides narratives of the exploits of a swordswoman and her famous sword, The Virgin-Girl sword (Yue Niu Jian). It was said that Hungtong was one of the earliest martial arts sect before Shaolin became famous. The development of Shaolin martial arts in Songshan was rapid after the founder of Tang Dynasty was saved from imminent death by 11 Shaolin monks. Tang Dynasty began in 618CE, about 91 years after the arrival of Bodhidharma. According to records, Bodhidharma died in 536CE in China, age 150 years old.

    Taoist philosophical and theological basis goes tangent with Buddhism. With her ultimate gaol of unity with God, it is more akin to Christianity and Hinduism then Buddhism. As to whether Wudang was influenced by Buddhism, my previous statements has answered it. Taijichuan’s basis is Taoist approach to harmony, the ‘duality’ aspect of two opposing yet complementary forces of Nature (including human nature). The only time that Taijichuan was ever influenced by Buddhism was the former’s later development in Shaolin as Zen-Taijichuan, but that was in the Ching Dynasty, about 3 centuries after Zhang San Feng was born.
    References :

  4. gamoNcrosman says:

    Yes, there are many martial arts older than Shaolin. There were warring states long before Shaolin existed and each warlord/army/state/village had their own fighting style/moves. When Ta Mo arrived in China he introduced 18 exercises/routines to the meditating monks to keep them from falling asleep. From those moves started the Shaolin kung fu style. Later on, most kung fu styles incorporated the Shaolin training regiment into their own system. That`s the simple version of the history.
    References :

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