Jun 16

Could you please elaborate a little on a specific striking technique?

Hello, I am a practioner of Karate (Ashihara) and Krav Maga. I have a theoritical curiosity, hence I ask this question. Could any of you please tell me the pro’s and con’s of shoulder strikes? How they are exactly employed and if they are effective? In the two styles that I practice they are almost not there (shoulder’s strength is employed in punches and other strikes but shoulder itself is rarely used). I have seen some direct shoulder strikes in demonstrations of the Chinese Art of Bajiquan and they looked quite different from whatever use of shoulders I had seen before. So, I request you to kindly shed some light on the topic and tell me if the art you practice has direct shoulder strikes or not and how do they work.

The shoulder strike you are talking about are not just in Baji but in many other Chinese martial arts styles, Taiji too. They are used close in or against a person charging in and they work beautifully. They do take timing though if you want to send a charging opponent flying. If you are just close in and don’t have your opponents momentum to help you shoulder strikes still work to upset your opponents balance and then follow up with something else like a throw, take down.
Karate has them too (Pinan Shodan) but are taught only at the advanced ranks and then often it is just done the way you turn into an opponent. They go along with the grappling techniques in Karate which also are taught in the advanced ranks.
Another fun technique I really like that is similar in timing and execution to the shoulder strike is using the hips. For a guy getting struck with the hips brings a whole new reaction for you if you get it right.

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5 comments!!!

  1. Keyboard Warrior says:

    Shoulder striking is something you should use when you happen to be in close quarters, meaning within someones reach. It’s not something you want to go for purposefully, meaning to get into someones reach for the sole purpose of hitting them with your shoulder. Some of the pro’s are obviously that your opponents don’t expect it. Your shoulder is a hard bony area. The cons to it are that shoulder strikes don’t do nearly as much damage as say a winding fist. You can’t wind your shoulder up and hit as hard as you can with a fist. Also, while your shoulders are hard and bony, they’re not particularly sharp as say your knees and elbows.

    If you need to use close quarters strikes, utilize your elbows, and when that fails, go for the shoulders as a last resort.

    A good example of shoulder striking at its finest and lowest http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=w_NGfYtSClM#t=120s
    References :
    Hope this kind of answered your question

  2. samuraiwarrior_98 says:

    There is a striking technique in karate called a driving knife hand strike that is largely used for this but you don’t see taught until at the advanced ranks and many schools don’t even teach today. This technique can be used for striking directly to the front of your opponent’s collar bone by driving the knife edge into that bone just below the surface of your skin and where it is very thin.

    This strike is also more commonly used for breaking people down and is very effective when used behind and into the shoulder joint or into the back of the bicep and then doing a sawing motion up and down against the nerve while turning their hand, little finger up towards the ceiling with your other hand, and to expose that nerve.

    I have used this strike several times that way in breaking a person down and getting them down, face first on the ground where they can be more easily controlled and restrained.
    References :

  3. Jas Key says:

    It’s essentially short distance body check. While it could create certain amount of damage, it’s more useful for off balancing and creating distance for follow up attack. A good comparison is the muay thai’s teep(push) kick.
    References :

  4. LIONDANCER says:

    The shoulder strike you are talking about are not just in Baji but in many other Chinese martial arts styles, Taiji too. They are used close in or against a person charging in and they work beautifully. They do take timing though if you want to send a charging opponent flying. If you are just close in and don’t have your opponents momentum to help you shoulder strikes still work to upset your opponents balance and then follow up with something else like a throw, take down.
    Karate has them too (Pinan Shodan) but are taught only at the advanced ranks and then often it is just done the way you turn into an opponent. They go along with the grappling techniques in Karate which also are taught in the advanced ranks.
    Another fun technique I really like that is similar in timing and execution to the shoulder strike is using the hips. For a guy getting struck with the hips brings a whole new reaction for you if you get it right.
    References :

  5. ? says:

    The shoulder strikes are more of a Chinese thing, and are especially prevalent in the internal arts. If you can generate real internal power and have good fajing, you can do a lot of damage with them. I can (and have) knock the wind out of people with mine. It’s also a well cushioned, bony area, and is great when you need to strike a hard surface; I’ve infrequently used mine to "fix" a vending machine when my item got stuck on its way down.

    They also improve your punches quite a bit if you master them. When I’m teaching boxing, I’ll frequently have guys go at the heavy bag with just their shoulders to teach them to use their hips to throw their punches.

    @KW: That’s not shoulder striking at "its best". Anderson Silva may be a lot of things, but a shoulder striker is not one of them.
    References :

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