Oct 30

How do I look and become more relaxed in martial arts?

I practice Wushu, the taolu parts. But in order for me to advance more I need to become more relaxed in my movements, at least look a bit more, which I certainly have some real trouble in (my trainers been on me quite alot, which is also why I really feel this is quite a problem, as I do want to advance further and become better). I think I have permission to say, I’m pretty flexible, especially in the legs. Do you guys have any special tips or tricks in at least looking and doing forms more relaxed? :) Anything is welcome from any martial artist :)

Dictionary:
Wushu: Chinese martial arts.
Taolu: The forms of Wushu / predetermined movement.

First, is make sure you are breathing correctly.

Second, stance work. Hopefully when you fist started off you would hold a stance for 30 seconds to a minute in preparation for learning the techniques you link together in a form. Go back to this. Work on your basic stances/steps- horse, crane, empty, lo (pu bu), and twisting or stealing step. Try to do at least one full minute each. You an build up to 5 minutes each. This will take about 30 minutes to an hour a day (5 for horse, 2 1/2 – 5 for each side of the other stances, then five more for horse again).

Third, qigong. This can be part of number two or a separate practice. Qigong helps you combine breathing with postures and simple movements. Any qigong will do, but if your teacher knows some or your style has its own system, use that.

Forth, going slow as suggested by another answerer. Slow forms practice will improve your lower body conditioning, balance, and overall performance. Watch a couple of Yang taijiquan form videos and copy the pace they go at with your favorite form(s). I would recommend you start with the first form you learned in your style and practice it repeatedly as slow as you can manage. Once you get the hang of it, then try your favorite form.

When trying to relax don’t make the mistake of trying to go limp. Limp is not relaxed. The word sung should have been translated as supple, not relaxed. You should have sufficient tension to maintain your posture without looking like you are straining. Mentally, sung is playfully dismissing distractions as they arise. Mental focus is vital to good martial arts.

6
comments

6 comments!!!

  1. Artist says:

    You might want to ask them to be sure, but I’ll try to help.

    Try practicing the tecniques slowly, and thinking about making it flow. It’s possible that they want your techniques to be fluid and controlled rather that overusing power. When you do the techniques and forms, do them slowly and focus on being relaxed.
    References :
    11 years martial arts

  2. Aon says:

    Relax-ness begins with your mind. You cannot be physically relax if you are mentally tense.

    Before you begin your forms, clear your mind of everything but what you are about to do. Imagine that there is nothing but you and the form – no room, no outside world, nothing; you are in a universe of just yourself.

    Break the forms down into just 1 or 2 movements and do them over and over slowly. Be aware of your breathing – no holding your breathe. Be aware of your legs and the pressure your foot exerts on the floor. Every move begins with the breath and then your legs – the rest of your body follows. But when you move, it is all one fluid motion. Think about how you use a fork (or chopstick) when you are eating – the motion of your hands and arms moving from plate to your mouth is very smooth and without tension; you have done it so many times in your life that it has become matter of fact. This is the same state you are wanting to achieve.

    It might also help you if you did some exercises such as jogging, skipping rope and such before you begin your practice. Do the exercise, rest a few minutes and do your forms.
    References :

  3. Matt says:

    I do Uechi Ryu, and some tips. Keep your muscles relaxed, and regulate your breathing from your oesophagus, deep breaths
    References :

  4. Billy ThePirate says:

    Don’t be stiffed and be… relaxed.

    Relax in everything will make it better.
    References :
    Trust me, I’m a professional.

  5. Edward says:

    First, is make sure you are breathing correctly.

    Second, stance work. Hopefully when you fist started off you would hold a stance for 30 seconds to a minute in preparation for learning the techniques you link together in a form. Go back to this. Work on your basic stances/steps- horse, crane, empty, lo (pu bu), and twisting or stealing step. Try to do at least one full minute each. You an build up to 5 minutes each. This will take about 30 minutes to an hour a day (5 for horse, 2 1/2 – 5 for each side of the other stances, then five more for horse again).

    Third, qigong. This can be part of number two or a separate practice. Qigong helps you combine breathing with postures and simple movements. Any qigong will do, but if your teacher knows some or your style has its own system, use that.

    Forth, going slow as suggested by another answerer. Slow forms practice will improve your lower body conditioning, balance, and overall performance. Watch a couple of Yang taijiquan form videos and copy the pace they go at with your favorite form(s). I would recommend you start with the first form you learned in your style and practice it repeatedly as slow as you can manage. Once you get the hang of it, then try your favorite form.

    When trying to relax don’t make the mistake of trying to go limp. Limp is not relaxed. The word sung should have been translated as supple, not relaxed. You should have sufficient tension to maintain your posture without looking like you are straining. Mentally, sung is playfully dismissing distractions as they arise. Mental focus is vital to good martial arts.
    References :

  6. CTC says:

    So RELAX….
    References :

Reply